Hair Replacement Systems Near Me

Hair Replacement Systems Near Me | Men’s & Women’s Guide!

If you’ve lost your hair and are looking for women’s and men’s hair replacement systems near you, don’t fret. There are plenty of options out there to help you feel confident again! Unfortunately, not all hair replacement options are equal, so you should learn about the different styles and their pros and cons before deciding which one to go with. We’ve got the best hair replacement for men near me here in this blog post!

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Hair loss is the loss of youth, vitality, and self-esteem for many men and women. However, hair loss is seen as the opposite in a culture that values aesthetics. There are numerous reasons for hair loss, including hormones, genetics, age, and medical reasons. More than half of men in the United States and the United Kingdom will suffer from hair loss at some point. Female pattern hair loss, known as androgenetic alopecia, is seen in various follicle sizes.

It often occurs in their 50s-60s, though it is prone to happen in the teenage years, and it affects about 30 million women (approximately 20%) in the United States alone. There are numerous treatment methods for men and women with thinning or balding scalps to restore the appearance or creation of new hair. Two types of women’s and men’s hair replacement solutions are Hair Loss Medications and Hair Transplantation.

Benefits of Hair Replacement

The best Hair replacement services near you is a grouping of medical, non-surgical, or surgical options for men and women that want to restore the appearance of hair growth. Candidates for hair restoration are those that lost their hair by androgenic alopecia, scarring alopecia, or permanent hair loss. In 2008, more than 98,000 hair transplant procedures were performed-about, 40% of worldwide figures. The days of permanent baldness are over, thanks to hair replacement technology breakthroughs. Hair transplantation and hair loss medications are two ways to reinstate hair growth.

Medications like Propecia, Rogaine and red light therapy for hair loss (LLLT hair treatment) have been shown to spark hair growth in men and women within weeks. Hair transplantation methods like Follicular Unit Transplant (FUT) and Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) take follicular units from growing regions (in strips or plugs) and implant them into balding areas of the scalp. Advancements in hair restoration have led to more natural-looking hair, improved hair growth, and minimal discomfort at a more affordable price. Benefits of hair replacement include a restoration of the density and distribution of hair growth, a more natural, youthful appearance, loss of anxiety, and increased self-esteem.

Whether you are suffering from minor hair loss or full-on baldness, many treatments are available. The days of peculiar-looking hair plugs are over. Instead, consult your physician about the best form of hair loss replacement for you, and you can regain your confidence, youthful appearance, and positive self-image.

What Our Guide Can Do For You

This article will explain what you need to know about surgical and non-surgical hair replacement, hair systems, and hair restoration treatment. If you are interested in the procedure and want to learn more about it, our guide will provide a summary of hair replacement – what is a hair replacement and how does hair replacement work; hair loss replacement for men; hair loss replacement for women; medical causes for hair loss; alopecia; hair replacement solutions; hair replacement cost: costs, fees, financing and insurance; hair replacement surgery; what to do after hair replacement; and before and after pictures of people that have undergone hair replacement surgery to give you a clearer idea how the procedures have been improved over the years-thanks to hair replacement technology.

Suppose you are interested in one of the many hair replacement procedures but are still determining which qualified specialist to contact. In that case, we have a professional surgeon locator to help you find one near you.

What are Hair Replacement Systems?

In a non-surgical hair restoration operation known as a hair replacement system, human or synthetic hair is put to a thin base or foundation that is then secured to the scalp using various techniques.

Hair Replacement Systems

Hair replacement systems are a more permanent solution to hair loss. They are made of real human hair and can be customized to suit your needs. Hair replacement systems give you a fuller, thicker head of hair that lasts until the next time it’s time to get your hair replaced.

So when you’re looking for the best hair system near me, here are some things to consider: 

1) You want the best quality.

2) You want something that will look natural.

3) You want something easy to maintain and care for.

4) You want something that blends well with your current hair color and style.

5) You want something long-lasting, so it won’t need replacing as often as a wig or hairpiece.

6) You want something that has a realistic hairline.

7) You want hair systems near me from a professional stylist who knows what they’re doing when blending different hair types together for an undetectable result.

8) You want someone who has done this before, who knows how important finding the perfect match between your existing hair and the new hair is when making an undetectable installation in which no one would ever know there was anything different about you.

What is Male Pattern Baldness?

Hair loss that is seen in thinning hair is called alopecia. The most common type of hair loss in men is androgenetic (or androgenic) alopecia-also known as Male Pattern Baldness. It is determined by hormones (androgens) and genetics. It affects at least half of all men at some point in their lifetime.

Androgenetic hair loss is mainly caused by three factors: genetics, hormones, and age. The presence of the necessary genes and hormones is not enough to cause baldness. Androgenetic alopecia is believed to be an inherited trait caused by changed sensitivity to a hormone found in the scalp called dihydrotestosterone (DHT) that determines the growth (anagen) phase of the hair cycle.

A normal anagen phase lasts 2-6 years, producing long, deep, thick, and well-pigmented hairs. A diminished anagen phase-decreasing from years to mere weeks or months-causes miniaturization of hair follicles, creating fewer and thinner anagen hairs.

The genetics that plays a role in androgenetic alopecia determine the age of onset for male pattern baldness, its progression, the pattern, and the severity of hair loss. The genes come from the person’s mother and father. Time (age) is another factor, as it is the hormone exposure over time that induces hair loss.

Each individual hair resides in a cavity of the skin known as a follicle. While hair normally grows back in men that have healthy hair growth, those suffering from androgenetic hair loss have follicles that have shrunk over time due to genetics, hormones, and age. The smaller follicles are unable to grow hair.

shrinking hair follicles

The first example (Image 1) is a comparison of two scalps. The first picture (left) is of a normal scalp with healthy, terminal hair. The hairs are thick and have a uniform diameter. The second picture (right) is of a scalp with many hairs that have decreased in diameter, a trait of androgenetic alopecia.

The second example (Image 2) is follicle shrinkage. The first picture (left) shows a normal hair follicle. The second picture (center) is of a follicle that has shrunk due to genetics, hormones, and time, creating shorter and finer hairs. The third picture (right) is of a small follicle that is unable to grow hair, resulting in baldness.

Norwood-hamilton scale of male pattern baldness

Dr. James Hamilton made progress in 1951 with a classification scale that graded hair loss in seven ways with a scale of 1-8 for each. Dr. O’tar Norwood simplified the rankings in 1975 to seven classes and added visual diagrams to chart the most common forms of pattern baldness. The Norwood baldness pattern scale shows two major patterns (bi-temporal recession and a gradually thinning crown that converse on the front and top scalp) and several unusual ones.

In the diagram of the Norwood scale (Image 3), the seven classes are highlighted.

Class I: is that of a scalp with a normal amount of hair that grows at a consistent rate. Hair loss is within acceptable levels in the anagen phase.

Class II: shows a slight recession of about 2cm at the most along the forehead in a generally symmetrical way-also known as a widow’s peak.

Class III: features three types of stages that can be characterized as baldness: the first has a deepening temporal recession, the Class III vertex has thinning on the crown, and the Class III A has a variable frontal recession. (“A” patterns occur in less than 10% of the population.)

Class IV: has two forms: the first is marked by an advanced frontal recession as well as reduced hair on the crown; the second, Class IV A, is a continued regression of frontal follicles behind the forehead and along the temples. (“A” patterns occur in less than 10% of the population.)

Class V has two forms: the first is a greatly reduced area of hair between the frontal and crown regions, as the frontal and crown balding have become more pronounced; Class V A is the loss of a significant amount of hair along the scalp as the frontal region recedes into the crown, though there is a great amount of hair on the rest of the head.

Class VI: is the loss of most, if not all, hair along the scalp that separates the frontal region from the crown, with little hair remaining on the top of the head.

Class VII: has the further reduction of hair on the top of the scalp, resulting in the majority of hair being in the occipital, region-forming a band around the ears and back of the head.

What causes Alopecia?

The most common causes of Alopecia include pregnancy (and post-partum conditions), thyroid disorders, and anemia; less common ones are autoimmune diseases, polycystic ovary syndrome, skin disorders (psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis), and medications (anabolic steroids, treatments for high blood pressure or depression). It would be best if you talked to a hair doctor to diagnose hair loss before seeking hair replacement procedures or replacement hair.

Alopecia areata, a genetic, autoimmune disease that creates round and bald patches, is a non-scarring type. Medical or dermatologic ailments like lupus, lichen planus, psuedopalade (creating smooth and white patches where hair used to be), and tinea capitis can cause. Intense sickness is known to cause reduced follicles.

In hypothyroidism (thyroid disease, affecting mostly women), the body produces too little thyroid hormone (which regulates metabolism, heart rate, and mood), altering the basal metabolic rate that your body uses energy and oxygen to function-including hair growth. Lupus, the chronic autoimmune disease where the immune system attacks healthy body tissue, brings about hair loss that is mild (when brushing or shampooing your hair) or severe-coming, out in patches and with a rash.

Iron deficiency anemia, when the blood doesn’t have enough red blood cells, can cause hair loss, as can polycystic ovarian syndrome in women caused by a hormonal imbalance of too many male hormones being produced.

Physical or emotional shock can cause general hair thinning. Stress brought on by major life events (death, divorce, lifestyle changes) and physical trauma (such as surgical and general anesthesia) can make hairs fall out. A physical shock from nutritional causes-dramatic weight loss in a short period of time, too much vitamin A, crash diets, protein/calorie/essential fatty acid/zinc deficiencies, and malnutrition-are other reasons for hair loss.

Drug-Induced Hair Loss

Drugs can interfere with normal scalp hair growth, leading to two types of hair loss: Telogen effluvium and Anagen effluvium.

  • Telogen effluvium: is the most common version of drug-induced hair loss, happening within 2-4 months of taking a drug. This causes the hair follicles to go into a resting phase (the telogen phase) and fall out early. A large number of drugs cause telogen effluvium, where hair is in a resting stage before it sheds-which is reversible when the medication is stopped.
  • Anagen effluvium hair loss: takes place during the anagen phase of the hair cycle, preventing new hair cells (matrix cells) from dividing normally. This happens within a few days to several weeks of taking medication, and it is often seen in people on chemotherapy-which is reversible when the procedure is stopped.

Other types of drugs that cause hair loss include: acne medications with vitamin A (retinoids); antibiotics and antifungal drugs; antidepressants; birth control pills; anti-clotting drugs; cholesterol-lowering drugs; immune system-suppressing drugs; drugs to treat breast cancer; epilepsy medication; high blood-pressure medications (anti-hypertensives) like beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, and diuretics; hormone replacement therapy; mood stabilizers; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; Parkinson’s disease medications; steroids; thyroid medications; and weight loss drugs.

Certain drugs (gout, colchicines, and allopurinol treatments), mood-alterers like Lithium and Prozac, and street drugs like cocaine) are known to cause hair loss.

The harshness of drug-induced hair loss is dependent upon the type of drug and its dosage, as well as the patient’s sensitivity to the medication.

Alopecia

The most common type of hair loss is androgenetic (or androgenic) alopecia-also known as Pattern Baldness. It is determined by hormones (androgens) and genetics. It affects at least half of all men and a large percentage of women at some point in their lifetime.

Androgenetic hair loss is mainly caused by three factors: genetics, hormones, and age. The presence of the necessary genes and hormones is not enough to cause baldness. Androgenetic Alopecia is believed to be an inherited trait caused by changed sensitivity to a hormone found in the scalp called dihydrotestosterone (DHT) that determines the growth (anagen) phase of the hair cycle.

A normal anagen phase lasts 2-6 years, producing long, deep, thick, and well-pigmented hairs. A diminished anagen phase-decreasing from years to mere weeks or months-causes miniaturization of hair follicles, creating fewer and thinner anagen hairs.

The genetics that plays a role in androgenetic Alopecia determine the age of onset for pattern baldness, its progression, the pattern, and the severity of hair loss. The genes come from both parents. Time (age) is another factor, as it is the hormone exposure over time that induces hair loss.

Each individual hair resides in a cavity of the skin known as a follicle. While hair normally grows back in men that have healthy hair growth, those suffering from androgenetic hair loss have follicles that have shrunk over time due to genetics, hormones, and age. The smaller follicles are unable to grow hair.

Hair replacement is available for those suffering from Alopecia. Surgical-Follicular Unit Treatment and Follicular Unit Extraction-and non-surgical hair replacement systems make it easier to bring back a head full of hair.

How d0 androgenetic Alopecia diagnosed?

Diagnosing androgenetic Alopecia is relatively simple. It takes into account the pattern of hair loss via miniaturized follicles. The presence of miniaturization in areas of thinning hair is a good indicator of androgenetic Alopecia.

One way to diagnose androgenetic Alopecia is through medical means. A densitometer, a handheld instrument that magnifies a small portion of the scalp, observes hairs clipped to 1mm in length. Other methods of diagnosis include a hair-pull test, taking a fungus scraping and culture, a microscopic examination of the hair bulb and shaft, and a biopsy of the scalp. Genetics also play a role in the diagnosis of androgenetic Alopecia, as it can be rooted in family hair loss history.

Factors that can lead to diffuse hair loss include medical conditions (thyroid disease, anemia) and medications (anabolic steroids, treatments for high blood pressure or depression), which stimulate hair loss. In these cases, laboratory tests such as blood chemistry, complete blood count, serum iron, thyroid functions, lupus, and syphilis can determine non-androgenetic balding.

Other Types of Alopecia

Patterned Alopecia is a form of androgenetic hair loss that recedes in a diagrammed pattern. Efforts to categorize different forms of patterned Alopecia were to establish the severity of hair loss and to determine the best course of treatment.

Two other forms of genetic hair loss are Diffuse Patterned Alopecia and Diffuse Un-patterned Alopecia. Diffuse patterned Alopecia, though related to androgenetic Alopecia, differs due to the hair in the front and crown thinning at different rates that allow you to see the scalp through the hairs.

Diffuse un-patterned Alopecia is also related to androgenetic Alopecia, and the hair loss mirrors that of the Class VII example on the Norwood scale. Unlike that form of androgenetic Alopecia, un-patterned Alopecia also results in thinner hair around the sides and back of the head.

In the fourth example (Image 4): pictures 1 and 2 show the gradual recession and transparent hairs due to diffuse patterned Alopecia. Pictures 3 and 4 demonstrate the hair loss on the top, crown, and occipital region around the head.

Image 4: Diffuse Patterned and Un-patterned Alopecia

Genetic Causes

Female pattern hair loss, known as androgenetic alopecia, is seen in various follicle sizes. It often occurs in their 50s-60s, though it is prone to happen in the teenage years, and it affects about 30 million women (approximately 20%) in the United States alone.

It is heredity, the result of two enzymes (aromatase, predominantly found in women, and 5-a reductase, carried by men and women). Women have more aromatase than men, and they have half the amount of 5-a reductase as their masculine counterparts. Aromatase, the main enzyme that forms female hormones estrone and estradiol, decreases the production of DHT. There is a link between 5-a reductase and androgenetic alopecia in men because of the DHT, causing the shrinking of hair follicles.

There are many methods of hair replacement for women. Surgical-including Follicular Unit Extraction and Follicular Unit Transplant-and non-surgical hair replacement (wigs, hairpieces, hair extensions, and medications) means are available.

Medical Causes

Medical reasons for female hair loss can be diagnosed by follicles uniform in size or sudden regression. The most common include pregnancy (and post-partum conditions), thyroid disorders, and anemia; the less common ones are autoimmune diseases, polycystic ovary syndrome, and skin disorders (psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis).

Certain drugs (blood thinners like warfarin and heparin, seizure medication like Dilantin, gout, colchicines and allopurinol treatments, cholesterol- and lipid-lowering medications, mood-alterers like Lithium and Prozac, thyroid care, oral contraceptives, and street drugs like cocaine), stress (and emotional problems), a physical trauma (such as surgery and general anesthesia), and intense sickness are known to cause reduced follicles.

Nutritional links-dramatic weight loss in a short period of time, too much vitamin A, crash diets, protein/calorie/essential fatty acid/zinc deficiencies, malnutrition-are other reasons for hair loss. Chemotherapy produces a type of hair loss called anagen effluvium that is reversible when the procedure is stopped.

A large number of drugs cause telogen effluvium, where hair is in a resting stage before it sheds-which is reversible when the medication is stopped.

Types of Hair Loss in Women

There are three types of hair loss in women: Diffuse Hair LossLocalized Hair Loss, and Patterned Hair Loss. Diffuse hair loss is when the hair in the front and crown is thin at different rates, making the scalp visible through the hairs.

Localized hair loss is categorized in two ways: scarring and non-scarring types. Scarring types can be caused by medical or dermatologic ailments like lupus, lichen planus, psuedopalade (creating smooth and white patches where hair used to be), local radiation therapy, and tinea capitis.

Traction alopecia, caused by hairstyles (braids, cornrows, tight ponytails) that pull on the hair, is a scarring form of hair loss that creates thinning or baldness along the frontal hairline and temples. Read how to tie hair to prevent hair loss.

Some types of scarring hair loss are reversible. Trichotillomania is more commonly associated with young women and involves habitual twisting, pulling, or tugging of hair, leading to broken hairs. Retrograde Alopecia or Alopecia areata, is a type of genetic, autoimmune disease that creates round and bald patches, is a non-scarring type.

Patterned hair loss in women is similar to that in men-thinning in the frontal or top regions of the scalp, with a majority of hair around the occipital region.

Two scales of comparison for female pattern baldness are the Ludwig classification scale and the Savin scale. They are similar in nature, though the Savin scale also measures overall thinning. The Ludwig scale is shown below, dividing hair loss into three main types.

Type I: Early thinning on top of the scalp from frontal accentuation. This is considered moderate hair loss.

Type II: The volume of hair on the scalp has decreased moderately, and there is an increase in patches of scalp loss. Diffuse thinning is visible.

Type III: The volume of hair on the scalp has decreased significantly. Diffuse thinning has led to hair follicles of various diameters. Deep frontal accentuation has taken place.

Hair loss replacement for women is easier than ever. Advances in hair replacement technology mean a greater variety of treatments available on the market. You can read more about ludwig pattern hair loss.

The Truth Behind Hair Loss

The most common reasons for hair loss in men are heredity, hormones, and age. However, research shows that most patients inherit the hair loss trait from the paternal or maternal side of the family. The medical term for inherited baldness is androgenetic alopecia, commonly known as male-pattern baldness and female-pattern baldness.

How Hair Grows

About ninety percent of your hair is growing at any one time. The other ten percent stays in a resting phase that lasts two to three months. The hair is shed at the end of the resting state, and new hair from the same follicle replaces the lost hair. Once this happens, the growth cycle is restarted. Hair loss is an ordinary daily occurrence. Believe it or not, 50 to 150 hairs (on average) are lost each day. Most of the hair lost experiences regrowth because the hair follicle remains. Once shedding begins to exceed hair growth by a considerable amount, baldness occurs. See how to stop balding and regrow hair.

How Does Hair Replacement Near Me Work?

For men and women with thinning or crown balding scalps, there are numerous treatment methods to restore the appearance or creation of new hair. Two types of hair replacement solutions are Hair Loss Medications and Hair Transplantation , as mentioned before.

Hair Replacement

Non Surgical Hair Replacement (Hair Loss Treatments)

Hair replacement technology in the last 20 years is evident in hair loss medications. Medications proven to slow hair loss and stimulate new hair growth are Finasteride (Propecia), Minoxidil (Rogaine), LLLT, and Dutasteride (Avodart). Both are non surgical hair replacement means and are available over the counter.

They have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Propecia is a prescription medication that is a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, stifling the conversion of testosterone into DHT. Minoxidil, sold over-the-counter as Rogaine, is a liquid or foam that you rub into the scalp two times daily to re-grow hair and slow hair loss. It comes in 2% and 5% forms. Finasteride is a hair growth medication similar to minoxidil that rejuvenates hair follicles to stimulate hair growth. Dutasteride is a product sold under the name Avodart that is a dual 5-a reductase inhibitor that prevents the conversion of DHT.

Hair Transplantation

Hair transplantation is a surgical option for men and women that want to conserve their remaining hair for the appearance of restored growth. This method of hair replacement surgery is used to correct androgenic alopecia, scarring alopecia, or permanent hair loss. The cause of hair loss must be determined before the surgical means are undertaken. A method of transplantation is Follicular fut hair transplant, done through Follicular Unit Extraction.

A follicular unit transplant (FUT) is a surgical technique for treating pattern hair loss in men and women. It is a procedure where hair is taken from the occipital zone (the areas in the back and sides of the scalp) and placed in recipient sites on bald or balding areas on the scalp to restore hair growth.

Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) is a way of extracting or harvesting donor hair for transplantation in a follicular hair transplant. During the procedure, small, circular incisions are made in the skin around a follicular unit, removing it from the surrounding tissue before pulling it out of the scalp and revealing a small wound. This is repeated until enough follicular units are harvested for restoration. This may take several hours or can be spaced out over two consecutive days. Wounds (about 1mm in size) heal completely within 7-10 days.

Replacement hair-human and synthetic is another hair replacement form. A toupée is a hairpiece or partial wig to cover bald areas of the scalp or for entertainment. It is created from natural or synthetic hair.

Hair Replacement Systems

A hair system wig is a full head of hair one can wear to cover hair loss for theatrical or fashion reasons. Wigs are often made from human hair, animal hair (horse, wool, yak, buffalo, and feathers), or synthetic fibers. A wig is longer and fuller than a toupee hair replacement system. Hair extensions for balding crown (including hair weaves) are the practice of adding human, animal feathers or synthetic hair to a person’s own hair. These are used to add length to one’s hair or to conceal thinning hair or hair loss.

To learn more, you may want to speak to a hair replacement specialist in your area. Use our surgeon locator to call and schedule a consultation.

How Much is Hair Replacement?

Hair replacement prices are varied, and there are inexpensive offerings for any budget. Hair replacement cost depends on the amount of hair loss experienced, the amount of donor hair available, the characteristics of the donor’s hair, and the patient’s desired results. Follicular unit extraction cost is often more expensive than follicular unit transplant.

Cost of Hair Replacement Surgery

For surgical hair replacement, the total cost ranges from $2,000-30,000-which include the facility, graft harvesting, equipment, and medication. Prices usually range from $2-10 per graft. The cost per graft typically drops with the increased size of the surgical session, a sliding scale approach that varies with the surgeon. Costs depend upon the surgeon, the technique(s) used, and the procedure size. Repair surgery for broken grafts averages costs an additional amount.

Some physicians charge a minimum amount for the hair replacement surgery procedure based on the number of grafts and/or the transplant site. You can find out more at a consultation.

Some people travel to second or third-world countries for their hair replacement procedure to reduce costs at the expense of consistent post-operative care and follow-up in the event of problems. It is best to use a reputable FUT or FUE hair replacement specialist.

Cost of Other Non-surgical Hair Replacement Near Me

For non-surgical hair replacement, a custom, quality toupee hair system runs between $20-1,600 and is recommended for replacement every year. Costs for grooming and reattachment run about $75 every 5-6 weeks. A wig, or “hair prosthesis,” ranges from $9-$30,000. Synthetic wigs are on the low end of the cost spectrum, and wigs made from human hair start around $800. Hair extensions range from $20 (synthetic clip-on) to $400 (human hair). Hair weaves top out around $2,000.

Propecia at 5 mg costs approximately $49-64 at the low end for a 30-day supply. 90-day supplies run between $180-280. Coupons are available to lower the price of Propecia. The 1mg version of Propecia is cheaper than the 5mg dosage. Generic forms of Propecia (Finpecia, Finax) range between $42-109 for a 90-day supply. Rogaine’s costs are as low as $17 for a one-month supply to $142 for a nine-month supply. Generic minoxidil costs as little as $10 for a one-month supply. Avodart ranges from $38-152 for a 30-day supply. Generic Avodart costs as much as $21-45 for a 30-day supply.

Hair Replacement Surgery Fees

Many physicians offer free, no-obligation consultations. Consultation fees range from $185-550. Additional fees come in the form of biopsies and laboratory tests. Deposits for procedures depend upon the physician, and they are applied to the total cost of the transplant. Post-operation visits and medications may cost extra; some physicians include these items in the total procedure cost.

For hair transplants, prices usually range from $2-10 per graft. It costs about $12-15 per graft to repair or transplant a graft into a scarred area.

Financing

For hair transplants, financing is available through physicians and third-party credit agencies. Some physicians offer interest-free financing for hair transplants. Plans range from 6-60 months.

Physicians also accept most credit cards, personal checks, and cashier’s checks. Other perks include travel accommodations (for patients coming in from long distances) and transportation.

Insurance

Most medical insurance plans do not cover hair transplants, as they are elective cosmetic procedures. However, hair loss from an accident, burns, or other physical trauma may be partially or fully covered.

There is debate over medical insurance not covering hair transplants as some believe that the psychological pains and anxiety, and lack of self-esteem and confidence felt by a loss of hair should warrant insurance coverage for hair transplants. Others feel that hair is an aesthetic feature and not a necessity, siding with medical insurers in not covering hair transplants.

Health insurance will often cover the cost of a wig in cases of hair loss due to chemotherapy, though it is more likely to be approved if referred to as a “hair prosthesis.”

Non-surgical Hair Replacement Treatment

Non-surgical hair replacement to restore the appearance or creation of new hair. One type of hair replacement solution is Hair Loss Medications. Another way is through hair replacement system – fitting & styling: toupées, wigs, and hair extensions. There are many treatments available on the market.

Hair Loss Medications

Hair replacement technology in the last 20 years is evident in hair loss medications. Medications proven to slow hair loss and stimulate new hair growth are finasteride (Propecia), Minoxidil (Rogaine), Kopexil, and Dutasteride (Avodart). Both are non-surgical means and are available over the counter. They have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

Propecia

Propecia is a prescription medication that is taken daily via pills. It is a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, stifling the conversion of testosterone into DHT. It is the only 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors approved for androgenetic alopecia.

Many patients have experienced a slowdown in hair loss, and some have reported new hair growth. Side effects of finasteride include reduced sex drive and sexual function, as well as an increased risk of a fast-growing type of prostate cancer.

Finasteride (Provillus and Propecia) should not be taken by women that are or want to become pregnant, as there have been reports of genital abnormalities in male fetuses of mothers that used the drug during pregnancy. However, women that are not capable of childbirth can use the drug, and it is shown to increase hair growth in those suffering from female pattern hair loss.

Minoxidil

Minoxidil, sold over-the-counter as Rogaine, is a liquid or foam that you rub into the scalp two times daily to re-grow hair and slow hair loss. It comes in 2% and 5% forms. Men and women can use minoxidil to treat pattern baldness and hair loss due to age and hormones.

Some experience new hair growth in approximately 12 weeks, and several report hair growth, a reduced rate of hair loss, or both. Minoxidil cannot regenerate hair growth on completely bald scalps. Side effects include scalp irritation and some unwanted hair growth along the forehead and face.

Kopexil

Kopexil is a hair growth medication similar to minoxidil. It rejuvenates hair follicles to stimulate hair growth. It is sold under the name Aminexil, and it comes in lotion, shampoo, foam, soap, spray, aerosol, emulsion, or vesicular dispersion forms.

Dutasteride

Dutasteride is a product sold under the name Avodart. It is a dual 5-a reductase inhibitor that prevents the conversion of DHT. It is normally used to treat an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia) but is also used to treat male pattern baldness.

Try these: best alternative to hair transplants. Other available option for you.

Hair Replacement Systems

Toupée

A toupée is a hairpiece or partial wig to cover bald areas of the scalp or for entertainment. It is created from natural or synthetic hair. They are worn mostly by men, though some women wear them to disguise balding scalp areas or to lengthen their hair. They are also known as hairpieces or hair units. They are held in place by adhesive or an elastic band.

Wigs

A wig for Alopecia Areata is a full head of hair one can wear to cover hair loss for theatrical or fashion reasons. Wigs are often made from human hair, animal hair (horse, wool, yak, buffalo, and feathers), or synthetic fibers. A wig is longer and fuller than a toupee. They can be custom-made or bought off-the-shelf. The hairs can be woven into silk threads (called “wefts”) and sewn to a net foundation to fit the head, or several hairs can be knotted together with small hooks (called “ventilating needles”) and attached directly to a foundation material. Some wigs use a combination of the two techniques.

Hair extensions

Hair extensions for bald spots cover up (including hair weaves) are the practice of adding human, animal feathers or synthetic hair to a person’s own hair. These are used to add length to one’s hair or to conceal thinning hair or hair loss. The least damaging form of hair extension is the clip-in (or clip-on) extension, which has toupée clips sewn into the weft to snap the hair into place.

Tracking is one of the most common forms of hair extensions and lasts longer than most, braiding and sewing the person’s hair horizontally across the head before hair weft extensions are sewn into the braids. Bonding extensions involve using hair glue- using latex acrylic or silicon (soft bond) or super glue (hard bond)-to seal a section of wefted hair onto one’s natural hair and last approximately 3-6 weeks.

Fusion uses a hot glue gun-like machine to attach human hair extensions to strands of natural hair for an authentic look, and it allows hair washing and the use of hair products like gels. Netting braids natural hair under a thin net to weave, sew or glue extensions into the foundation. Lace fronts are created from a nylon mesh material formed into a cap that has knotted single strands of hair, which can be woven or attached to a person’s hairline with adhesives.

Side effects from sewn-in hair extensions include discomfort and permanent hair damage, and loss from weave retightening-leading to traction alopecia. Read more about do wigs cause hair loss.

Hair Transplant Recovery Timeline

To ensure that the transplanted area heals and that the grafts take hold. Recovery methods and times for follicular unit transplants and follicular unit extractions are similar, and you are encouraged to follow up with your doctor for appointments and general concerns.

The First Three Days

The surgeon will put a headband on the transplant area. For the first few nights after the hair transplant, the physician encourages you to sleep with your head elevated on pillows. You may be given medication for sleeping if it is necessary, and antibiotics are generally not needed. There will be general soreness and possible numbness in the donor area for the first day.

The morning after the surgery, you will remove the headband to shower and shampoo your scalp gently and thoroughly three times that day to ensure the site is free of blood. No bandages are needed after the first shower. Soreness in the donor area should be gone, though some numbness may remain. There may be scabbing and moderate redness on the second and third days, which is normal. Patients can resume normal activities almost immediately, though exercise should be limited for the first week. You should avoid alcohol for three days after the transplant.

The Next 4-10 Days

Medication to handle the pain of swelling may be given, as there may be swelling of the forehead, bridge of the nose, cheeks, and around the eyes that goes away after the first week.

For the rest of the week, you should shower the scalp twice a day, gently cleaning the transplant area with a special shampoo. Residual crusting from the donor area can be removed with running water from the shower. Swelling should subside within a week, the redness should be faint and absent, and the transplant area should feel and look like a week-old beard.

Grafts will take hold within 10 days, and wounds (about 1mm in size) heal completely within 7-10 days. If you follow instructions, the transplant is modestly detectable after a few days and nearly unnoticeable after 10 days. You can resume normal shampooing, brushing, and hair care (including a haircut) after about 10 days. There should be a follow-up appointment with the physician after 10 days.

After 10 Days

There may be shedding of your original hair within two weeks, and the transplanted area may appear thinner for a brief period. Finasteride may be given to halt hair follicle miniaturization-though its effect on shedding is still unknown. Exhausting exercise should be avoided for several weeks-depending upon the donor incision and scalp tolerance.

No smoking is encouraged for two weeks following the surgery. The hair length should appear to be that of a crew cut after two weeks. You should wear a hat in strong sunlight for two weeks, followed by using sunscreen with an SPF of 30+. Hair should be the length of a short haircut after three weeks. You can dye your hair four weeks after the procedure.

Newly transplanted hair should begin to grow around 10 weeks. It should be long enough to be groomed within 6 months and fully grown within a year. This will be corrected when the new hair starts to grow.

How Can I Find a Good Hair Replacement For Men Near Me?

This blog post provides a directory google map of experienced hair replacement surgeons. Feel free to browse our map to find a hair replacement doctor in your area who’s right for you. Once you find a hair replacement surgeon in your area, set up a consultation, which is the first step to getting this procedure. Hair Replacement surgeons can vary in experience and technique. So, develop good questions for your potential hair replacement surgeon based on the information you find on in this article, hair replacement systems near me.

The material in this article may answer many of your hair replacement general questions. Still, questions unique to you can only be answered by a good hair replacement doctor during a one-on-one consultation.

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